Get Lit! Book Club with Tricia

Sunday, February 25, 2024 - 6:00pm to 7:00pm

Welcome to the new Get Lit! Book Club!
This book club will meet at Auntie's Bookstore the last Sunday of every month from 6-7pm.

Leading up to the Get Lit! Festival held in April, this book club will be reading a book each month by one of the contributing authors. The discussion for these meetings is focused on craft elements: use of language, how form works within the genre, what readers found compelling, what challenged them while reading, etc. Genres will range from fiction to nonfiction to poetry.

For more information click here to visit the book club webpage.

 

February Selection

In February we will be discussing Cipota Under the Moon by Claudia Castro Luna.

In Cipota under the Moon, Claudia Castro Luna scores a series of poems as an ode to the Salvadoran immigrant experience in the United States. The poems are wrought with memories of the 1980s civil war and rich with observations from recent returns to her native country. Castro Luna draws a parallel between the ruthlessness of the war and the violence endured by communities of color in US cities; she shows how children are often the silent, unseen victims of state-sanctioned and urban violence. In lush prose poems, musical tankas, and free verse, Castro Luna affirms that the desire for light and life outweighs the darkness of poverty, violence, and war. Cipota under the Moon is a testament to the men, women, and children who bet on life at all costs and now make their home in another language, in another place, which they, by their presence, change every day.


 

Leader: Tricia (she/her)
Contact: tricia@auntiesbooks.com
Book Club Webpage: https://www.auntiesbooks.com/get-lit-book-club-tricia

Event address: 
Auntie's Bookstore
402 W Main Ave
Spokane, WA 99201
Books: 
Cipota under the Moon: Poems By Claudia Castro Luna Cover Image
$19.95
ISBN: 9781882688616
Availability: On Our Shelves Now
Published: Tia Chucha - May 20th, 2022

In Cipota under the Moon, Claudia Castro Luna scores a series of poems as an ode to the Salvadoran immigrant experience in the United States. The poems are wrought with memories of the 1980s civil war and rich with observations from recent returns to her native country.